10 Best Black Golfers

Updated on: October 2020

Best Black Golfers in 2020


Game of Privilege: An African American History of Golf (John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture)

Game of Privilege: An African American History of Golf (John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
  • Array

Just Let Me Play: The Story of Charlie Sifford, the First Black Pga Golfer

Just Let Me Play: The Story of Charlie Sifford, the First Black Pga Golfer
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Array

Fair Ways: How Six Black Golfers Won Civil Rights in Beaumont, Texas (Swaim-Paup-Foran Spirit of Sport Series, sponsored by James C. ’74 & Debra ... Edgar Paup ’74, & Joseph Wm. & Nancy Foran)

Fair Ways: How Six Black Golfers Won Civil Rights in Beaumont, Texas (Swaim-Paup-Foran Spirit of Sport Series, sponsored by James C. ’74 & Debra ... Edgar Paup ’74, & Joseph Wm. & Nancy Foran)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Keys to the Effortless Golf Swing - New Edition for LEFTIES Only!: Curing Your Hit Impulse in Seven Simple Lessons (Golf Instruction for Beginner and Intermediate Golfers Book) (Volume 3)

The Keys to the Effortless Golf Swing - New Edition for LEFTIES Only!: Curing Your Hit Impulse in Seven Simple Lessons (Golf Instruction for Beginner and Intermediate Golfers Book) (Volume 3)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

The Golfing Good Life: Golf Instruction for Golfers Over 50: Black and White Edition

The Golfing Good Life: Golf Instruction for Golfers Over 50: Black and White Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

The Complete Golfer

The Complete Golfer
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Golfers Guide to Mental Fitness: How To Train Your Mind And Achieve Your Goals Using Self-Hypnosis And Visualization

Golfers Guide to Mental Fitness: How To Train Your Mind And Achieve Your Goals Using Self-Hypnosis And Visualization
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

The Miami Times and the Fight for Equality: Race, Sport, and the Black Press, 1948–1958 (Sport, Identity, and Culture)

The Miami Times and the Fight for Equality: Race, Sport, and the Black Press, 1948–1958 (Sport, Identity, and Culture)
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

What's a Golfer to Do?: 343 Techniques, Tips, and Tricks from the Best Pros

What's a Golfer to Do?: 343 Techniques, Tips, and Tricks from the Best Pros
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Developing the Junior Golfer: A Guide to Better Golf for Students and Parents

Developing the Junior Golfer: A Guide to Better Golf for Students and Parents
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

'Being Mary Jane' Shares Another Side of the Single Black Female at the Urbanworld Film Festival

Now that the 2020 Urbanworld Film Festival treated audiences to the World Premiere of BET's Original Film "Being Mary Jane," it's clear that stories about single black women can revolve around more than dating pitfalls and recreational sex.

Now that the 2020 Urbanworld Film Festival treated audiences to the World Premiere of BET 's Original Film "Being Mary Jane" written by Mara Brock-Akil, it is clear that stories about single black women do not have to solely revolve around dating pitfalls and recreational sex. The film, which also serves as a backdoor pilot for the BET Networks' 2020 lineup, stars Gabrielle Union -- an actress with experience in playing the role of a single, successful woman who appears to have it all, except for the loving and fulfilling relationship she longs for.

In "Daddy's Little Girls " directed by Tyler Perry, Union plays a successful bulldog attorney struggling to find a suitable mate when love arises from an unlikely place with baggage that jeopardizes her chances for having a meaningful relationship. In "Deliver Us from Eva " directed by Gary Hardwick, Union plays an anal and single health inspector with a sharp tongue whose extended family pay a man to date her so she can stop interfering in their love lives. In "Being Mary Jane" directed by Salim Akil, however, she kicks the singlehood role up a notch by stepping into the shoes of one woman who is facing many more challenges than meets the eye.

Union brings writer Mara Brock-Akil's story about a single African-American woman to life, complete with all of the family drama, spiritual growth, professional bureaucracy and inner turmoil that is rarely seen in films catering to urban audiences. Mary Jane has many layers because she provides different things to the people in her life -- almost to an extent that meeting her own needs get lost in the process. As Mary Jane caters to the demands of a career that she loves and the stress of responsibilities she didn't ask for, who takes care of her? Also, where and when is she going to find the right mate while discovering the intentions and viability of unqualified suitors? -- a question that seems to be the whole point of Akil's latest work.

In between audiences' humor, empathy and cheering for this woman to come out on top, there is an underlying reminder that no one really knows what Mary Jane is going through. Just when viewers are either judging her choices or nodding their heads along with this woman's actions and feelings because they feel like they finally "get" her, Mary Jane offers up a surprise that even her best friends and close confidants would never see coming. If relateably strong female characters leading complex lives are what Marak Barak-Akil is cooking up with Gabrielle Union serving a full-course meal of genuine modern-day struggles that single women understand all too well, movie goers will eagerly add "Being Mary Jane" to their regular TV diet.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like