10 Best Golf Courses You Can Play By State

Updated on: September 2020

Best Golf Courses You Can Play By State in 2020


Golf Magazine's Top 100 Courses You Can Play

Golf Magazine's Top 100 Courses You Can Play
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
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Golf Brown County (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 8)

Golf Brown County (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 8)
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Great Donald Ross Golf Courses You Can Play

Great Donald Ross Golf Courses You Can Play
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
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Golf Whistling Straits – The Irish Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 2)

Golf Whistling Straits – The Irish Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 2)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

Golf Erin Hills (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 6)

Golf Erin Hills (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 6)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Golf The Bog (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 7)

Golf The Bog (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 7)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Golf The Bull at Pinehurst Farms (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 5)

Golf The Bull at Pinehurst Farms (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 5)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

From Tee to Shining Tee: Discovering America One Golf Course at a Time

From Tee to Shining Tee: Discovering America One Golf Course at a Time
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Golf Blackwolf Run – Meadow Valleys Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 4)

Golf Blackwolf Run – Meadow Valleys Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 4)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Golf Blackwolf Run – River Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 3)

Golf Blackwolf Run – River Course (Golf in Eastern Wisconsin Book 3)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

A New Way to Get Your Golf Course Tournament Ready

A comparison of current methods of painting golf holes for tournament preparation at your golf course.

Think of all of the factors you and your crew consider leading up to a big corporate or member event at your club. You spend time marking hazards, manicuring the greens, tees and fairways, making sure that the bunkers are groomed perfectly, that cart directional signs are properly placed, and that the course is set up in a fair but challenging way.

As is common in setting up for important tournaments, superintendents will often apply a ring of white paint to the exposed soil inside the cup, in essence framing the pin placement. Painting the hole in this fashion is aesthetically pleasing but also serves to highlight the placement, making it stand out better and be easier to see when making an approach shot or putting.

Surprisingly there are not many tools available on the market to help make this job easier. Superintendents use everything from a can of spray paint and a piece of cardboard with a cut out, to a can of paint and a brush, to some of the few applicators that are available on the market. The most common is a metal device that essentially sits over the hole, has a recessed cradle in which a can of white marking paint is placed upside down, and then the can is pressed downwards while the operator rotates the can, coating the soil wall with white paint. Sounds great, but the limitation is that since the operator has to turn the can while the device stays stationary, coverage can be quite uneven. Another issue with this design is the fact that some of the framing of the cradle interferes with the flow of paint emitted from the can leaving areas that receive little to no paint. Correcting the coverage problem involves turning the entire device a quarter turn and then applying another coat to fill in the gaps. The result is very messy and time consuming for the pin changer, almost becoming a job all on its own.

Last year our club caught wind of a new device that seems to have addressed all of the issues of the standard application methods. The device is simply called the L.B. Golf Hole Painter and works very well. The unit is made of powder coated metal and consists of two dinner plate size discs that rotate freely over one another, a receiver sleeve to hold the can of paint, and a levered handle that applies even down pressure on the paint can. Once the hole has been cut and the cup is set, the unit is placed over the opening, the bottom disc sits directly on the putting green surface, while the top disc floats directly on top of it separated by a series of ball bearings on a track. Once lined up, the paint is placed in the sleeve, the handle folded over the bum of the can, and then the handle is evenly rotated delivering a smooth and consistent coat of paint. Depending on desired shade, a second rotation can be performed. The nicest features of the L.B. Golf Hole Painter is that because of the design there are no obstructions to the flow of paint while applying, and the applicator does not need to rotate the entire can to get coverage, just turn the handle and the top disc turns freely over the bottom fixed plate.

As of right now there doesn't appear to be an operating website with info on this product, but they are in production and the owner/inventor of it, Leo Breau can be contacted at leobreau@sympatico.ca .

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